Exhibitions

Open Lab—Chinese and Japanese Gardens



Open Lab—Chinese and Japanese Gardens

Curator: Ruijun Shen

Participants: Cao Lindi, Liang Shuo, Ouyang Kunlun, Zheng Guogu 

2015.12.12-2016.1.31

 

 

The Open Lab will compare Chinese and Japanese gardens, analyzing their differences on a substantive level to uncover the cultural content and implications within. The goal of this experiment is to use the concrete example of the landscaped garden to further understand China’s unique vision of the world. Compared to the enclosed system of production, observation and evaluation that marks Chinese painting, gardens are more like “readymade artworks,” encompassing many different techniques, which can be directly employed by artists in installation and artwork related to space. We have invited two artists, one architect, and one garden scholar, to take us on a journey through the gardens of Kyoto, Japan, and Suzhou, China, discussing as we wander in an attempt to combine field observation and theory, identify elements of tradition that can be transformed and applied in contemporary art practice. The gardens of Suzhou, those representatives of Ming and Qing landscape art, emphasize “joy.” On this note, we invited the artists to create an artwork about space on the theme of “how to vividly, interestingly and reasonably pile miscellaneous objects.” Liang Shuo and Ouyang Kunlun designed “Miscellany Garden” of wandering and enjoyment using readymade materials based on Chinese garden a floorplan drawn by Mrs. Cao Lindi. Zheng Guogu’s “Monocrystal Garden” uses the lines of Chinese decorative window frames and the effects of light to produce a meditative space brimming with energy. The two spaces, one material, one virtual, both utilize contemporary art methods, drawing their inspiration from the research and observation of Chinese and Japanese gardens.

 

Organizer: Times Museum

Special Thanks to: Times Property

Art Works:

TOP