Programmes

TALK|OPEN LAB:CHINESE AND JAPANESE GARDENS The Genealogy of Stone Placement and Representations of Seashores in Japanese Gardens


Time:  2016/1/31  15:30-17:30

Venue: 1F Multi-function hall, Guangdong Times Museum

Free entry, Japanese with Chinese consecutive translation

 

Japanese gardens have developed since ancient times, and various styles of gardens appeared in each historical period. However, all Japanese gardens have two points in common: the placement of stones and representations of seashores.

 

The oldest landscaping guidebook Sakuteiki (作庭記) from the late 11th century defines the foundation of the art as the placement of stones and says it is carried out in a dialogue between the gardener and the stones. Japanese landscaping centers on such upright positioning of natural, unprocessed stones, and the history of this primordial action can be traced back to the Stone Circles of the Jomon Period (c. 12000BC-300BC). In gardens, while water and sand flow, plants grow and wither, and buildings rot and are rebuilt, stones possess an incomparable stability. Therefore, the composition of stones can be regarded as the framework of Japanese gardens.

 

Based on this foundation, Japanese gardens imitate a variety of real or unreal landscapes, especially, those of seashores. Ponds that appear in many Japanese gardens represent the sea and reflect a longing for the seashore. Among various types of representations of seashores, Suhama (洲浜), sandy seashores with a curved coastline, is said to be a uniquely Japanese motif. It has played a role of symbolizing the purity of sacred places or the power of the Emperor in not only gardens, but also paintings, crafts, and so on. 

 

Therefore, the history of Japanese gardens can be considered as the history of the dialectic between stones, solid and stable matter, and representations of seashores, moving and unstable representations. In this talk, I will discuss the meaning of stone placement and representations of seashores in Japanese gardens, and approach the essence of Japanese gardens in a broader context.

 

 

About lecturer

 

Rurihiko Hara (原 瑠璃彦) 

Born in 1988. Rurihiko Hara is a doctoral student at the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, and Research Fellow of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. He majors in Gardens, Noh and Kyogen in Japan. He also worked as a dramaturge in stage performances such as Ryuichi Sakamoto+Mansai Nomura+Shiro Takatani’s Nohgaku Collaboration "LIFE-WELL” (2013) and Yuko Hirai’s “Sarumuko —The face of strangers,” and director of Research Installation “Park Atlas” in Moon Kyungwon + YCAM’s exhibition “Promise Park—Rendering of Future Patterns" (2015).

 

About Open Lab

 

Guangdong Times Museum invites artists to create site-specific works by short-term residency, which breaks with the norm that museums only present finished artworks, and introduces the audience into the process of artistic production. 

Artists are encouraged to step out of their studios by the supports and resources provided by the museum, in addition to funding and assistance, their art projects are implemented and recorded in order to support further explorative and thought-provoking artworks. Meanwhile, combining the community and spaces both inside and outside of the museum, the audience can attain access to the thinking and creative processes of artists by means of exhibitions, lectures, seminars, screenings, workshops and other forms. 

Open Lab strives to create an ecosystem that incorporates artists and artworks, artworks and museums, museums and audiences, providing an experimental platform for artists to present and discuss their works while exploring the relationships between the museum, the community and its residents.  

 

 

                                                For more information: www.timesmuseum.org


TOP