Programmes

Talk: From 8mm and 16mm to HD and cellphone video – research on 30 years of Filipino alternative and experimental moving image practice



Talk

 

From 8mm and 16mm to HD and cellphone video – research on 30 years of Filipino alternative and experimental moving image practice

 

Time2016.4.24 SUN 15:00-17:30

VenueMulti-functional Hall, Ground Floor, Guangdong Times Museum

Guest Speaker: Shireen Seno

Moderator: Dayang Yraola 

OrganiserGuangdong Times Museum

PartnerRooftop Institute

Special ThanksTimes Property 

*Conducted in English with Chinese consecutive translationLimited seats with free admission 

 


In our current exhibition South by Southeast. A futher Surface, Intransit (Jakuawal Nilthamrong, 2003) , a 35mm film projection, pays homage to sci-fi film technique in the 1960s and 1970s where filmmakers experimented with the "Organic Effect" to depict life in space, and American experimental filmmakers explored film media as a conceptual art form.

 


Kerelby Jon Cuyson from the Philippine, takes its inspiration from the German avant-garde filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Querelle, which is a film adaptation of the Jean Genet novel Querelle de Brest published in 1947.

 


The video projection was created by using found videos uploaded by Filipino seamen on YouTube, which Cuyson selected and then edited to form a loose narrative of the sea and the tale of a Filipino sailor working on a ship as a painter. Cuyson used Genet’s words in the edited footage to help form an undefined yet fluctuating narrative. These transitory expressions of lived experience bear witness to a particular shift in perception that navigates between document and memory, reality and imagination, figuration and abstraction. 

 


 


 

We invite director Shireen Seno and independent curator Dayang Yraola to introduce “The Kalampag Tracking Agency”,a screening program in the form of an initiative. It’s an organizational collaboration between Shireen Seno of Peliculas Los Otros and Merv Espina of Generation Loss.

 “The Kalampag Tracking Agency”, featuring some of the most striking films and videos from the Philippines and its diaspora from the past 30 years, this programme was curated within the uncharted topographies of Filipino alternative and experimental moving image practice, with a variety of formats, techniques and textures; from 8mm and 16mm to HD and cellphone video; from optical print experiments, ethnographic documents and video installations, to explore relations between film/video on different mediums.

 


Shireen Seno is a lens-based artist and filmmaker whose work addresses memory, history, and image-making, often in relation to the idea of home. She has had two solo exhibitions in Manila and received international recognition for her film, Big Boy (2012), shot entirely on Super 8. Her photo zine, Trunks, has been exhibited at MoMA, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles, and the Tokyo Art Book Fair. Seno also curates and organizes screenings and talks under Los Otros, a moving image studio and platform dedicated to producing and exhibiting films with unique personal voices, working with initiatives from abroad to bring artist-filmmakers and experimental film and video programs to Manila and vice versa. Shireen co-curated The Kalampag Tracking Agency, a program of Philippine moving image practice over the past 30 years, which has screened at notable film festivals, art institutions, and public spaces.


Dayang Yraola is an independent curator and writer based in Manila and Hong Kong. She was a Thomas Jefferson Foundation fellow in 2001; appointed arts associate of the National Art Gallery Singapore through Singapore International Foundation in 2010; recipient of the Asian Cultural Council grant for her research in Southeast Asia and Hong Kong; and the Japan Foundation in 2013 for her research in media art in the Philippines, and in 2014 and 2015 for curatorial projects. She is currently a postgraduate student of Cultural Studies at Lingnan University through the Hong Kong Postgraduate Fellowship Scheme. 

Photos:

TOP